Image

Apache Wedding Blessing

Exif JPEG

~~~

Poor Ol’ Kaw-Liga

My hometown has its very own “Kaw-Liga.”  I don’t know how many of you are familiar with the humorous Hank Williams song “Kaw-Liga,” but it was extremely popular back in the 1950’s and 60’s in the U. S. It was the story of a wooden Indian (American Indian) who stood consistently in front a store and, unfortunately, fell in love with a wooden Indian maiden who stood at the door of an antique store not far away. When I discovered this carving masterpiece in front of a hometown store recently, I was taken back to the days of Hank Williams and his famous song. I knew I had to share it.

The link below the photo is to a video of a live performance of the song by Johnny Cash and Hank Williams, Jr. (the author’s son) — recorded at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee, when the Opry was still in its original home at the Ryman Auditorium right in the middle of downtown Nashville. That auditorium holds a lot of wonderful memories for me, because my family and I lived in Nashvillle during some of those years, and we attended the Opry and took family and friends numerous times to rub shoulders with the country music greats. This video is my personal favorite recording of the song because it offers so much in the way of atmosphere as the cameras pan the auditorium from time to time.

Even if you’ve never heard the song before, hop over and listen. You’ll enjoy it!

Exif JPEG

Wonder if he’s still in love …

Watch Video Here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=VL1MCqZQ5dU

 

(Should there be anyone reading this post who feels that this subject matter in any way treats Native Americans in a derogatory manner, let me hasten to say that I am Native American and am very proud of that heritage. As such, I am not the least bit insulted by the song or the wooden sculpture, and as far as I’m concerned, that settles the issue.)

 

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Close

I was so touched by this Apache Wedding Blessing when a friend shared it with me.  He is the former president of the Four Winds Intertribal Society, Inc. in the U. S. and travels the country teaching Native American history and culture. I thought it was appropriate for this week’s challenge, since it so accurately describes one of life’s “closest” relationships.