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WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: 3 ‘Broken’ Things

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WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

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9 thoughts on “WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: 3 ‘Broken’ Things”

    1. Gerry, it does have quite a story, and, of course, it’s too long to tell here, but I’ll give you some tidbits. ( I put some of this info on Gilly’s comment as well.) It’s actually the home of one of the families who first founded the town where I live. They started the first store (more like a trading post at the time) in the county and worked to develop our area in so many ways. They grew very wealthy and two trusts that they established for the continued growth and development of the area still provide monetary gifts to many individuals and organizations today. They go so far back that the man who first built the house actually worked for a while with Abraham Lincoln — before he got into politics, of course.

      The home eventually became a museum of the history of our area, but gradually it began to deteriorate badly. Even the bricks themselves would not hold together well. So the area historical society tore it down and built an exact replica on the premises of our local junior college — along with two other historic buildings, and they give tours there throughout the year.

      They wanted to use the original bricks for the re-build, but they were just too deteriorated. However, they did manage to dig up many of the original plants and re-plant them around the new house. The society then donated the property to Habitat for Humanity, which builds houses for people who cannot afford to purchase a home in the normal fashion. It was an extremely poignant event for many people in our area, and that’s why I was on the scene to take a number of photographs and do a front-page news story on it. That property will never be the same, but I’m also sure the original owners would be thrilled to know what it’s being used for now.

      1. Wow! Sandra a story I did not expect, in fact a far better one than that which could be imagined. I do love these pictures or articles have so much more than what is revealed to the eye. This is fantastic with the history and Abraham Lincoln connection. Thank you Sandra for this piece of your history…Maybe if you can get a picture of the rebuilt project…

        1. I’m glad you enjoyed it, Gerry. I should be going over there again before too long and will try to get a picture. A good friend of min is the president of the historical society, and he gives tours there regularly except during winter.

    1. Gilly, it’s actually the home of one of the families who first founded the town where I live. They started the first store (more like a trading post at the time) in the county and worked to develop our area in so many ways. They grew very wealthy and two trusts that they established for the continued growth and development of the area still provide monetary gifts to many individuals and organizations today. They go so far back that the man who first built the house actually worked for a while with Abraham Lincoln — before he got into politics, of course.

      The home eventually became a museum of the history of our area, but gradually it began to deteriorate badly. Even the bricks themselves would not hold together well. So the area historical society tore it down and built an exact replica on the premises of our local junior college — along with two other historic buildings, and they give tours there throughout the year.

      They wanted to use the original bricks for the re-build, but they were just too deteriorated. However, they did manage to dig up many of the original plants and re-plant them around the new house. The society then donated the property to Habitat for Humanity, which builds houses for people who cannot afford to purchase a home in the normal fashion. It was an extremely poignant event for many people in our area, and that’s why I was on the scene to take a number of photographs and do a front-page news story on it. That property will never be the same, but I’m also sure the original owners would be thrilled to know what it’s being used for now.

      Gerry commented on the story behind the house in an earlier comment, but I haven’t had time to answer him yet, so I need to put this same information in his answer. I think he’d be interested.

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