Poetry

Waiting On Tomorrow (a poem)

WATCHING HOURGLASS

If I had known in days gone by
The things I know today.
I’d have thought and felt and acted
Sometimes, in different ways.
If yesterday’s tomorrows had not
come ahead of time,
But waited ’till I’d learned some more
And made it to my prime,
I would have done a better job
Of living properly.
If wisdom from today had been
Unveiled back then to me.
And now, I’d like to put a hold
On life’s full speed ahead,
Just until tomorrow brings me
Knowledge from up ahead.

Why, I could guarantee success!
I could live the perfect way!
Could I just get my tomorrows
To become my yesterdays!

~~~
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8 thoughts on “Waiting On Tomorrow (a poem)”

    1. Well, I should say first that it isn’t a perfect example of what I’m going to tell you, but, for the most part it is a combination. It is definitely iambic because in most of the feet, the first syllable is unaccented, and the second is accented. But in general, this is set up so that the first and third lines of each stanza are in iambic tetrameter (with 4 beats per line.) And the second and fourth lines are in iambic trimeter (with only 3 beats per line.) But don’t count too closely. In order to be iambic pentameter, it would need 5 beats (5 accented syllables) per line.

        1. But you are a poet, and if I were over there (across the pond), I’d pound that into your head. You’d be surprised how many people find haiku and tanka intimidating and wouldn’t want to try it. So it’s just that some things work better for different people. Most people aren’t like me — trying a little of everything — especially if it’s something new and totally different. But you have to remember that I get bored easily, so that’s one reason I do so many different things. Also, I guess I don’t want to finish my life on this earth not having given as many different things a chance as possible. (Well, as long as they’re good things.)

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